June 9, 2017 at 12:05am

Just as people ask if driverless cars will replace the joy of driving and if sending email kills the warm personal touch of writing a traditional letter, people too, are asking if it is really possible for computers to make music. Music, after all, has been an essential part of human existence for as long as civilisations have existed. Now then, to what extent can humans accept music that is artificially-created as part of their lives?

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Goh Zensen

A side track to this is: It is easier to get the computer (organ/keyboard) to harmonise for your melody than to teach someone to do so. Likewise, it is easier for the computer to identify your... See More

A side track to this is: It is easier to get the computer (organ/keyboard) to harmonise for your melody than to teach someone to do so. Likewise, it is easier for the computer to identify your chord (based on your notes played) than to teach someone to do it. Thank goodness the computer is unable to identify the key of a piece of music yet. If it is able to (in time to come), it will indeed be a scary era.

June 9, 2017 at 12:17am
Carlyn Ng

If the computer harmonises the melody, is it creative enuff to figure out which chord progression is better?

October 14, 2017 at 12:44pm
Goh Zensen

There is an AI engine in the computer software. If this engine is able to constantly gather human inputs as to which harmonisations/progressions are better, it will "learn" over time so that... See More

There is an AI engine in the computer software. If this engine is able to constantly gather human inputs as to which harmonisations/progressions are better, it will "learn" over time so that future churning outs will be "better".

October 25, 2017 at 9:36pm
June 29, 2017 at 10:19pm

Richard Clayderman's Coup de Coeur.
Feeling nostalgic indeed.

Saw a discussion among some Pianovers about Richard Clayderman, and suddenly thought of this piece - one of my all-time favourites.

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Goh Zensen

Lovely piece!

July 4, 2017 at 8:51am
Gan Theng Beng

The first time i hear this song i dont think much about it. The 2nd time i hear it, got some feelings, after 3rd hearing the tune keep lingering in my minds and now i am hooked.

July 12, 2017 at 9:46pm
Carlyn Ng

Wow! Didn't know abt this piece. Nice to know!!

October 16, 2017 at 3:20pm
March 30, 2017 at 1:09pm

If only my piano teachers had explained to me the purpose of scales and arpeggios all those years when I was learning the piano, I believe I would have taken to them with greater enthusiasm. But somehow none ever did ! It was only after I stopped learning the piano that I realized how important they were as finger exercises . So a message for all piano teachers: Explain to your students what these exercises are for and I'm sure you'll have an easier time getting them to practise them :)

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Adelynn Khoo

I think it's important to work on having both hands equally strong. Corrine did point out the boring aspect of it, which often discourages the student. Hahaha, not easy being a piano teacher. I... See More

I think it's important to work on having both hands equally strong. Corrine did point out the boring aspect of it, which often discourages the student. Hahaha, not easy being a piano teacher. I wonder how a piano teacher can add it to the lesson plans without the kids screaming. ?

October 13, 2017 at 5:26pm
Carlyn Ng

How abt Czerny?

October 14, 2017 at 12:41pm
Chris Khoo

Oh absolutely . The school of velocity :)

October 14, 2017 at 12:53pm
Carlyn Ng

Haha.. yes.. ? and I'm guessing his Art of Finger Dexterity isn't popularly explored by many.

October 14, 2017 at 3:01pm
May 18, 2017 at 12:54am

Was watching this VOD about the side of piano competitions usually unknown to most people - piano tuners' work

ps: video is only available for streaming till 29th May so do watch soon if you are interested to know ?

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Sng Yong Meng

This is really great sharing!! I enjoyed the documentary so much! Hope they don't really take it off after 29 May 2017! That would be a pity.

May 19, 2017 at 2:24pm
Wenqing

probably can download and reupload it to youtube to share here permanently but might be illegal :x

May 20, 2017 at 1:18am
Adelynn Khoo

Oh no.. it's no longer available! ?

October 13, 2017 at 1:00pm
September 10, 2017 at 6:40pm

A question here regarding choice of rhythm for improvised arrangements:

Choosing between two rhythms to play a set of three notes as follows - playing them as a triplet, or as 2 dotted notes back-to-back.
ie: 2 dotted quavers followed by 1 quaver (or the quaver then 2 dotted quavers) vs playing them as a triplet.

What is the difference between them as such (rhythm apart)? To my understanding, playing the sequence as a triplet inspires a sort of 'equality' to the melody... See More

A question here regarding choice of rhythm for improvised arrangements:

Choosing between two rhythms to play a set of three notes as follows - playing them as a triplet, or as 2 dotted notes back-to-back.
ie: 2 dotted quavers followed by 1 quaver (or the quaver then 2 dotted quavers) vs playing them as a triplet.

What is the difference between them as such (rhythm apart)? To my understanding, playing the sequence as a triplet inspires a sort of 'equality' to the melody they produce; that is to say they are given equal emphasis. Whereas in comparison, by using the dotted rhythms one can choose to give emphasis to the dotted quavers. Apart from this, i cant discern any other notable difference in applying either rhythm.

Anyone have other insights with regards to this?

July 31, 2017 at 3:21pm

I do have a question regarding arranging music that has been bugging me for a while. What exactly is arranging and how different is it from an actual composition of a song? My perception is that an arrangement is basically a version of a song that a player created. If it is wrong or if someone can give me an elaboration, I'd really love to hear it. Also, is there any way or any instance that an arrangement could be so different from the original composition that it can be considered a... See More

I do have a question regarding arranging music that has been bugging me for a while. What exactly is arranging and how different is it from an actual composition of a song? My perception is that an arrangement is basically a version of a song that a player created. If it is wrong or if someone can give me an elaboration, I'd really love to hear it. Also, is there any way or any instance that an arrangement could be so different from the original composition that it can be considered a composition on it's own? Thank you!

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Goh Zensen

But in the real world of music, there are several pieces whereby their original versions weren't written for piano solo -they can be for the full orchestra, or for the pop band. So we need either... See More

But in the real world of music, there are several pieces whereby their original versions weren't written for piano solo -they can be for the full orchestra, or for the pop band. So we need either professional arrangers to arrange them for piano solo playing purposes, or we arrange them ourselves. One example is Tchaikovsky's Marche Slave for the full orchestra. But for play-by-ear musicians like myself, I would rather arrange my own piano version for Marche Slave instead of playing by score on someone else's arrangement. For many pop music, sometimes we don't even have their original scores because the composers/arrangers don't prepare them. Instead, they are produced into their final audio forms (using arrangement software) straightaway.

August 6, 2017 at 3:52pm
Goh Zensen

Your last question is a tricky one. There is a thin line among compositions, arrangements and improvisations. The acid test is really whether the main motiff (melody line or tune) is still... See More

Your last question is a tricky one. There is a thin line among compositions, arrangements and improvisations. The acid test is really whether the main motiff (melody line or tune) is still recognisable. The arranger can add lots of ornaments to it to make it sound in a different style, but if the tune is still recognisable, we will still say it is an arrangement for that particular composition.

But if it sounds totally different (we don't hear any glimpse of the original song's melody at all), that we can't even say this is an arrangement of that particular composition - so it is on its own (own original composition/arrangement).

However, sometimes the case may not be so straightforward. For example, the arranger can retain the main melody notes, but arranges something completely original say for its long prolonged interlude. Nevertheless we will still recognise that this is an arrangement of the original composition.

August 6, 2017 at 3:45pm
Zafri Zackery

Woah....I didn't expect a whole essay, haha. But I do believe that my understanding on the concept is way better now. Though it might take me a while to understand everything, I do think it has... See More

Woah....I didn't expect a whole essay, haha. But I do believe that my understanding on the concept is way better now. Though it might take me a while to understand everything, I do think it has been a great help that I appreciate a lot. Thank you!

August 7, 2017 at 6:51pm
Goh Zensen

Haha, this is because you were asking one of the BIG questions in music, just like if anyone asks any of the 7 big questions in economics such as what causes inflation and what causes unemployment... See More

Haha, this is because you were asking one of the BIG questions in music, just like if anyone asks any of the 7 big questions in economics such as what causes inflation and what causes unemployment, I'm sure the economics lecturer will answer longer than an essay!

August 7, 2017 at 10:59pm
May 12, 2017 at 2:08pm

What is a musician's preferred flavour of cake?

Ti-re-mi-so

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Goh Zensen

Haha you shouldn't have given the answer straightaway!

May 12, 2017 at 10:36pm
Sng Yong Meng

Lol. Ok, next one!

May 13, 2017 at 4:53pm
May 7, 2017 at 11:53pm

Just completed the Mini-Recital on 32 pieces of classical works! In the future, would like to look for co-performers for future recitals. Genres could be Chinese Classical, New Age, Jazz and Siblings (blues, broadway, big band, ragtime, boogie-woogie), Marches & Patriotic Songs, Easy Listening, Soundtrack, TV & Jingles, Western Pop/Oldies, Asian Pop/Oldies or World/Folk/Ethnic/Traditional tunes!

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Sng Yong Meng

Maybe even original compositions! =)

May 8, 2017 at 12:02am
Goh Zensen

Yes!

May 8, 2017 at 12:05am
Pek Siew Tin

ten q Mr Sng Yong Meng - founder of thepiano.sg. thru pianover meetup i get to know lots of piano expert... Mr Zensen Goh kb skill is excellent ^+^

May 8, 2017 at 8:04am
April 21, 2017 at 11:54am

Let's discuss another highly divided topic in Music Aesthetics. In order for a piece of music to be regarded as highly aesthetic/beautiful (好听/优美 in Chinese), does it need to be infusing advanced music concepts or elements (please note that it isn't about being technically challenging such as having to run very fast passages, etc.), such as the use of advanced chords (over and above the basic ones), the deployment of good modulations and counterpoints, or the utilization of sophisticated... See More

Let's discuss another highly divided topic in Music Aesthetics. In order for a piece of music to be regarded as highly aesthetic/beautiful (好听/优美 in Chinese), does it need to be infusing advanced music concepts or elements (please note that it isn't about being technically challenging such as having to run very fast passages, etc.), such as the use of advanced chords (over and above the basic ones), the deployment of good modulations and counterpoints, or the utilization of sophisticated rhythms?

In other words, can very simple pieces (say only using three basic chords like I, IV & V) using the straightforward diatonic scale (and 4/4 time signature) without having any modulations can sound as nice and superior as those above?

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Tea Zhi Yuan

Hi Zensen:) Really enjoyed your post. My own belief is that simplicity is its own beauty and and piece (or song) doesnt require all the complex rhythms, not-so-commonly-used chords etc etc. I seem... See More

Hi Zensen:) Really enjoyed your post. My own belief is that simplicity is its own beauty and and piece (or song) doesnt require all the complex rhythms, not-so-commonly-used chords etc etc. I seem to prefer a clear, "pure", and accessible melodic line and accompaniment rather than one with complex devices. I think that a perfect example of "simple yet beautiful" music is Mozart's music. The melodic lines of his works are clear and accessible (for sure) but yet this is something alluring in his music to the point it almost mysterious! Allow me to quote pianost Artur Schnabel who once explaimed:" Mozart's sonatas are too easy for children, too difficult for (serious) artists"

April 30, 2017 at 6:26pm
Goh Zensen

Hi Zhi Yuan, I'm glad to hear your viewpoints on this! Proponents of your school of thought also cite traditional folk music which are so simple and yet so beautiful! For example, who doesn't like... See More

Hi Zhi Yuan, I'm glad to hear your viewpoints on this! Proponents of your school of thought also cite traditional folk music which are so simple and yet so beautiful! For example, who doesn't like Home on the Range?

May 1, 2017 at 12:49am

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