gavin-koh-6941's picture
January 8, 2019 at 3:52pm

I just finished my 12th original composition and released the piano solo sheet music, that to me is kind of a milestone.

The new piano solo piece is called "An Unforgettable Adventure". You can listen to it on SoundCloud by clicking the image below (don't forget to "Follow" me there to get updates). The background for this piece is where you have a truly memorable adventure, one filled with peaceful moments, reflective moods, and quite a bit of excitement.

A friend of mine... See More

I just finished my 12th original composition and released the piano solo sheet music, that to me is kind of a milestone.

The new piano solo piece is called "An Unforgettable Adventure". You can listen to it on SoundCloud by clicking the image below (don't forget to "Follow" me there to get updates). The background for this piece is where you have a truly memorable adventure, one filled with peaceful moments, reflective moods, and quite a bit of excitement.

A friend of mine actually interpreted "An Unforgettable Adventure" as a monument to life. She said that the first part of the song reflects childhood and youth, the middle part is akin to sprinting through life in your career, and for me, I feel that the ending part reflects old age. Nevertheless, that's still an adventure to me. An adventure in life!

Hope you will like it. I might perform it at Pianovers Meetup one day. Thanks.

#composing

gavin-koh-6941's picture
October 14, 2018 at 2:16pm

Time to share my 5th "nugget" of musical knowledge:
Chordify is a website that automatically transforms music from Youtube or Soundcloud into chords. Relying on deep neural networks to output chords for your song, they are geared to help pianists, guitarists, and ukulelists. So, if you rely on chords or play by ear, then save some time with Chordify. Paying members can transpose and even play around with the tempo. If you don't wish to create an account, you can use their search tool... See More

Time to share my 5th "nugget" of musical knowledge:
Chordify is a website that automatically transforms music from Youtube or Soundcloud into chords. Relying on deep neural networks to output chords for your song, they are geared to help pianists, guitarists, and ukulelists. So, if you rely on chords or play by ear, then save some time with Chordify. Paying members can transpose and even play around with the tempo. If you don't wish to create an account, you can use their search tool for free to check whether chords already exist for your favourite song.

For example, here are chords to Broken Vow, a lovely piece from Lara Fabian.
https://chordify.net/chords/lara-fabian-broken-vow-marcopantoja

#composing

gavin-koh-6941's picture
November 1, 2017 at 1:16am

If you were composing piano pieces, what music notation software would you recommend - MuseScore, Finale, Sibelius, or something else?

#composing

adelynn-khoo-6442's picture
March 19, 2018 at 11:31pm

When composing a song, does the melody come first, or the lyrics?

#composing

goh-zensen-1469's picture
April 2, 2017 at 10:07pm

At my recent talk on composing and arranging at Anglican High, I highlighted to the O-Level music students on the importance to deepen one's understanding of music theory in order to be a superior music arranger. Then one of the them asked me this question, "Would ABRSM Grade 8 theory suffice?"

#composing

gavin-koh-6941's picture
November 2, 2017 at 11:27am

Has anyone here composed and sold pieces of their own? Would love if you could share your experiences.

#composing

goh-zensen-1469's picture
April 14, 2017 at 3:16pm

Someone has recently raised the subject matter on the improvisatory nature of baroque and classical period composers. Many of them were in fact improvising AS THEY WERE composing. But they only (largely) documented ONE VERSION of their improvisation, which is the score archived till today for others to play. There are larger implications to music and music education, which many disagree with me. So far few people (e.g. Dr Leonard Tan, conductor of the Singapore National Youth Symphony... See More

Someone has recently raised the subject matter on the improvisatory nature of baroque and classical period composers. Many of them were in fact improvising AS THEY WERE composing. But they only (largely) documented ONE VERSION of their improvisation, which is the score archived till today for others to play. There are larger implications to music and music education, which many disagree with me. So far few people (e.g. Dr Leonard Tan, conductor of the Singapore National Youth Symphony Orchestra) agree with me.

The implications are: Why must we be having to have the DOGMA of having to play every single note (dictated on the documented score) to the last letter WHEN the composer himself could have used a slightly different set of notes if he had written the score using another improvised version of his work?

And it is exactly this dogma, passed through the centuries and generations, that the general conventional music fraternity is holding dearly to. Don't get me wrong - this definitely has its important purpose which we need to maintain. I'm more referring to the general player who simply wants to appreciate and enjoy playing classical music (not joining an orchestra or be a concert pianist) - why must they choose the "only" route on score-reading?

If we can embrace improvised versions of Mozart's Symphony No 40 in jazz version and Mambo version, wouldn't it be strange then, that we ask FOR THE SCORES for these versions? [That we want to rely on a precise score to play EVEN an IMPROVISED version of a work!] See the logical fallacy here?

#composing