September 10, 2017 at 6:40pm

A question here regarding choice of rhythm for improvised arrangements:

Choosing between two rhythms to play a set of three notes as follows - playing them as a triplet, or as 2 dotted notes back-to-back.
ie: 2 dotted quavers followed by 1 quaver (or the quaver then 2 dotted quavers) vs playing them as a triplet.

What is the difference between them as such (rhythm apart)? To my understanding, playing the sequence as a triplet inspires a sort of 'equality' to the melody... See More

A question here regarding choice of rhythm for improvised arrangements:

Choosing between two rhythms to play a set of three notes as follows - playing them as a triplet, or as 2 dotted notes back-to-back.
ie: 2 dotted quavers followed by 1 quaver (or the quaver then 2 dotted quavers) vs playing them as a triplet.

What is the difference between them as such (rhythm apart)? To my understanding, playing the sequence as a triplet inspires a sort of 'equality' to the melody they produce; that is to say they are given equal emphasis. Whereas in comparison, by using the dotted rhythms one can choose to give emphasis to the dotted quavers. Apart from this, i cant discern any other notable difference in applying either rhythm.

Anyone have other insights with regards to this?

July 31, 2017 at 3:21pm

I do have a question regarding arranging music that has been bugging me for a while. What exactly is arranging and how different is it from an actual composition of a song? My perception is that an arrangement is basically a version of a song that a player created. If it is wrong or if someone can give me an elaboration, I'd really love to hear it. Also, is there any way or any instance that an arrangement could be so different from the original composition that it can be considered a... See More

I do have a question regarding arranging music that has been bugging me for a while. What exactly is arranging and how different is it from an actual composition of a song? My perception is that an arrangement is basically a version of a song that a player created. If it is wrong or if someone can give me an elaboration, I'd really love to hear it. Also, is there any way or any instance that an arrangement could be so different from the original composition that it can be considered a composition on it's own? Thank you!

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Goh Zensen

But in the real world of music, there are several pieces whereby their original versions weren't written for piano solo -they can be for the full orchestra, or for the pop band. So we need either... See More

But in the real world of music, there are several pieces whereby their original versions weren't written for piano solo -they can be for the full orchestra, or for the pop band. So we need either professional arrangers to arrange them for piano solo playing purposes, or we arrange them ourselves. One example is Tchaikovsky's Marche Slave for the full orchestra. But for play-by-ear musicians like myself, I would rather arrange my own piano version for Marche Slave instead of playing by score on someone else's arrangement. For many pop music, sometimes we don't even have their original scores because the composers/arrangers don't prepare them. Instead, they are produced into their final audio forms (using arrangement software) straightaway.

August 6, 2017 at 3:52pm
Goh Zensen

Your last question is a tricky one. There is a thin line among compositions, arrangements and improvisations. The acid test is really whether the main motiff (melody line or tune) is still... See More

Your last question is a tricky one. There is a thin line among compositions, arrangements and improvisations. The acid test is really whether the main motiff (melody line or tune) is still recognisable. The arranger can add lots of ornaments to it to make it sound in a different style, but if the tune is still recognisable, we will still say it is an arrangement for that particular composition.

But if it sounds totally different (we don't hear any glimpse of the original song's melody at all), that we can't even say this is an arrangement of that particular composition - so it is on its own (own original composition/arrangement).

However, sometimes the case may not be so straightforward. For example, the arranger can retain the main melody notes, but arranges something completely original say for its long prolonged interlude. Nevertheless we will still recognise that this is an arrangement of the original composition.

August 6, 2017 at 3:45pm
Zafri Zackery

Woah....I didn't expect a whole essay, haha. But I do believe that my understanding on the concept is way better now. Though it might take me a while to understand everything, I do think it has... See More

Woah....I didn't expect a whole essay, haha. But I do believe that my understanding on the concept is way better now. Though it might take me a while to understand everything, I do think it has been a great help that I appreciate a lot. Thank you!

August 7, 2017 at 6:51pm
Goh Zensen

Haha, this is because you were asking one of the BIG questions in music, just like if anyone asks any of the 7 big questions in economics such as what causes inflation and what causes unemployment... See More

Haha, this is because you were asking one of the BIG questions in music, just like if anyone asks any of the 7 big questions in economics such as what causes inflation and what causes unemployment, I'm sure the economics lecturer will answer longer than an essay!

August 7, 2017 at 10:59pm