October 31, 2017 at 5:59pm

Joke riddles for pianists (with cringeworthy answers):
a) What do you get when you drop a piano down a mine shaft?
b) Why was the stupid pianist banging his head against the keys?
c) What is the difference between a piano and a fish?
d) Why did Mozart kill his chickens?
e) Why is crossing the street like playing the piano?
f) What do you call a laughing piano?

of 13
Gavin Koh

Just got back from a Pianovers meetup... Haha... I was correct, but my reasons were very different. The oboe player would say to the conductor - "Ho bo?" (Hokkien / Singlish as in "Are you okay... See More

Just got back from a Pianovers meetup... Haha... I was correct, but my reasons were very different. The oboe player would say to the conductor - "Ho bo?" (Hokkien / Singlish as in "Are you okay?"), which is a homophonic play on the word "oboe".

November 13, 2017 at 6:30pm
Adelynn Khoo

Omg.. Lolz! So imaginative, Gavin! I couldn't have guessed "Ho Bo"!!

November 13, 2017 at 1:09pm
Gavin Koh

[Headslap] Or, perhaps the conductor says "Oboe," and the oboeist gives a thumbs-up in reply to what he thinks is the conductor asking "Ho bo?" The conductor therefore thinks he is the most... See More

[Headslap] Or, perhaps the conductor says "Oboe," and the oboeist gives a thumbs-up in reply to what he thinks is the conductor asking "Ho bo?" The conductor therefore thinks he is the most obedient.

November 13, 2017 at 10:16pm
Goh Zensen

Haha, hilarious!

November 13, 2017 at 10:44pm
November 9, 2017 at 11:27am

Too bad we have no polls like those on Facebook. What do you think about the following ideas for Pianovers? Should we have them? What does our organizer, Yong Meng, himself say to these?

a) Allow for that rare diversity in pianovers performances. Maybe piano + vocals, piano duos, trios, quartets, etc. Would be great to collaborate with like-minded musicians
b) Poll the Pianovers community and pick the best youtube performance so that they can be invited back to play again. Or... See More

Too bad we have no polls like those on Facebook. What do you think about the following ideas for Pianovers? Should we have them? What does our organizer, Yong Meng, himself say to these?

a) Allow for that rare diversity in pianovers performances. Maybe piano + vocals, piano duos, trios, quartets, etc. Would be great to collaborate with like-minded musicians
b) Poll the Pianovers community and pick the best youtube performance so that they can be invited back to play again. Or maybe they could be given a Pianover Reward card? Or something like that.
c) Allow the pianist to contribute some write-up that can then be presented to the audience too.
d) Create a Facebook group for Pianovers.
e) Attain 50 performances and get a free Pianover Reward card?
d) Opening to the floor: Anyone have any other proposals?

of 1
Sng Yong Meng

Thank you for your valuable suggestions, Gavin! We welcome feedback from the community, and will include them as part of our decision making process! Cheers!

November 11, 2017 at 2:03pm
November 6, 2017 at 5:21pm

A question: What comes to mind when a foreigner asks you to tell them more about "Singaporean Music"? Do we label ourselves as a culture that churns out patriotic songs only during National Day? Or is there truly a Singaporean identity - elusive though it may be?

of 7
Gavin Koh

For sharing: Our very first patriotric songs, Stand Up for Singapore, Count on me Singapore, We are Singapore, were outsourced and composed by a Canadian jazz pianist, Hugh Harrison, who was... See More

For sharing: Our very first patriotric songs, Stand Up for Singapore, Count on me Singapore, We are Singapore, were outsourced and composed by a Canadian jazz pianist, Hugh Harrison, who was working for McCann-Erickson, a global advertising company then. It was only later on that we got Singaporeans contributing. With people like Dick Lee and Jeremy Monteiro composing Home and One People, One Nation, One Singapore respectively. So, are our National Songs representative of Singaporean music?
http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/INFOPEDIA/articles/SIP_2015-03-11_165927.html

November 8, 2017 at 9:19am
Goh Zensen

Viewpoints are subjective, and are thus never about whether it is valid. Meaning while it can be valid for me, it isn't valid to you.

November 8, 2017 at 4:10pm
Mabel Ong

But still worth sharing? ?

November 9, 2017 at 10:56am
Goh Zensen

Maybe I'll just touch on the tip of the ice-berg: Some mention that Xinyao (新遥) is one pivotal genre that represents "Singaporean Music". On the premise that even if we agree with this, what... See More

Maybe I'll just touch on the tip of the ice-berg: Some mention that Xinyao (新遥) is one pivotal genre that represents "Singaporean Music". On the premise that even if we agree with this, what defines Xinyao? Translated literally into English, it means "Singaporean Folk Music". Eric Moo is supposedly one of the most "central figures" in Xinyao. But he is a Malaysian. So does that count? But about English songs composed by Singaporeans (another can of worms)? In fact there are deeper sociopolitical forces at play that can be traced back to the saga of Nanyang University (not NTU).

More importantly (and musically), how should the style of Xinyao be like? If we look at the most stereotypical Xinyao piece 邂逅 (see following link):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3tG-1yONdU

It has a very "pure" and "simple" melody line, very "campus-like" and accompaniment is on solo guitar. And indeed many other pieces in the Xinyao genre that came later are also possessing these similar features / characteristics.

But some have "evolved" or "expanded" to possessing the style of Hard Rock, Hip-Hop and Dance. Do we still call this Xinyao?

So if one really would like to explore the "Singaporean Identity in Music" - it is worth not just a journal article, but perhaps an entire book.

November 10, 2017 at 8:44am
April 17, 2017 at 8:10pm

What is your take on this? If a person is feeling very sad, should he be listening to a melancholic piece such as Tchaikvosky's Pathetique symphony? Or should he be listening to a cheerful and joyful piece like Mozart's Paris Symphony?

of 5
Goh Zensen

Hmm, so you feel it depends on the individual.....

April 19, 2017 at 8:17pm
April 20, 2017 at 9:05am
Goh Zensen

Interesting, thanks for sharing!

April 20, 2017 at 11:33pm
Mabel Ong

I will listen to sad ones, to connect with my inner self. ?

November 7, 2017 at 11:22am
April 21, 2017 at 4:03pm
of 12
Gavin Koh

Nope. I got rid of mine about a year back because one of the strings busted - too much Liszt. I think the Roland was worth it though, for my composing needs. But I do miss the weight of the... See More

Nope. I got rid of mine about a year back because one of the strings busted - too much Liszt. I think the Roland was worth it though, for my composing needs. But I do miss the weight of the acoustic keys. Anyway, my new job brought me to MND Annexe and the pianos outside URA Centre are available to me everyday now.

November 3, 2017 at 2:00pm
Mabel Ong

Wah.. you write songs?

November 3, 2017 at 7:06pm
Gavin Koh

Trying to write something now.

November 4, 2017 at 5:22pm
Mabel Ong

That's cool! Share with us when you're done!

November 7, 2017 at 10:58am
May 14, 2017 at 8:44pm

Dutch pianist and composer Jeroen van Veen built a life-sized Lego Piano over a period of more than two years. Consisting of almost 30,000 second-hand Lego bricks, the idea of building the Lego Piano came about over a debate at the coffee table between Jeroen and his two sons. He gave his first public performance on the Lego Piano in his concert in Almere, Netherlands on Friday, 12 November 2016.

of 1
Carlyn Ng

Waa... Big Lego Piano!!! *drools.. ?

October 29, 2017 at 1:11am
June 9, 2017 at 12:05am

Just as people ask if driverless cars will replace the joy of driving and if sending email kills the warm personal touch of writing a traditional letter, people too, are asking if it is really possible for computers to make music. Music, after all, has been an essential part of human existence for as long as civilisations have existed. Now then, to what extent can humans accept music that is artificially-created as part of their lives?

of 3
Goh Zensen

A side track to this is: It is easier to get the computer (organ/keyboard) to harmonise for your melody than to teach someone to do so. Likewise, it is easier for the computer to identify your... See More

A side track to this is: It is easier to get the computer (organ/keyboard) to harmonise for your melody than to teach someone to do so. Likewise, it is easier for the computer to identify your chord (based on your notes played) than to teach someone to do it. Thank goodness the computer is unable to identify the key of a piece of music yet. If it is able to (in time to come), it will indeed be a scary era.

June 9, 2017 at 12:17am
Carlyn Ng

If the computer harmonises the melody, is it creative enuff to figure out which chord progression is better?

October 14, 2017 at 12:44pm
Goh Zensen

There is an AI engine in the computer software. If this engine is able to constantly gather human inputs as to which harmonisations/progressions are better, it will "learn" over time so that... See More

There is an AI engine in the computer software. If this engine is able to constantly gather human inputs as to which harmonisations/progressions are better, it will "learn" over time so that future churning outs will be "better".

October 25, 2017 at 9:36pm
May 12, 2017 at 2:08pm

What is a musician's preferred flavour of cake?

Ti-re-mi-so

of 2
Goh Zensen

Haha you shouldn't have given the answer straightaway!

May 12, 2017 at 10:36pm
Sng Yong Meng

Lol. Ok, next one!

May 13, 2017 at 4:53pm
April 26, 2017 at 7:32am

It was a very distressing moment, then, when in April 2007, an Austrian-made Bösendorfer grand piano found its way onto a set of granite steps. The GBP26,000 (SGD78,000 in then’s terms) instrument was being delivered to its new owners at Devon in southwest England, when accident struck.

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